prayer

This Sunday at Mayfair | October 22nd 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we heard the Bible’s last words on prayer.

Our study in Revelation continues—this week, in chapters eight and nine.

According to the Barna research group, an overwhelming majority of Americans say they pray, but how, why, and to whom we pray can vary drastically. There are some consistencies though. For example, most Americans have an individualistic perspective on prayer.

When we pray, sometimes (and maybe even most times), we either pray on autopilot or let our circumstances control how we pray. We pray in the way that seems best to us. But what does God want us to learn about prayer in His last book?

Read Revelation 8:1-5 and you’ll find a few things there. First, prayer is valuable and important. So if you’ve been struggling with doubts about prayer or find you’ve been taking it for granted, take a look at these verses. Another important point is that there’s something sacrificial about prayer. It’s an offering, a submission of our will to His. Whatever your fears or hopes, sacrifice them to God in prayer.

And like Revelation tells us, He will hear, and He will act.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

PS: Trunk or Treat is October 29th. Bring your trunks, your costumes, your candy, and get ready to have a great time with the kids in the community!

This Sunday at Mayfair | August 27th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we learned from the parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector.

One of the hallmarks of a great story is the way it treats stereotypes. Many stories employ stereotypes, but the greatest stories use them to teach us, and the parables of Jesus do just that.

In Luke 18:9-14, Jesus gives us a parable based on two stereotypes: a Pharisee and a tax collector. In our time, we’ve re-stereotyped Pharisees as hypocritical and elitist, but if we want to get the full effect of Jesus’s parable, we need to remember that the Pharisee’s were the “good guys.”

The people hearing the parable, started out thinking “I want to be like the Pharisee, not the tax collector.” But if we immediately stereotype the Pharisee and come away saying “I want to be like the tax collector, not the Pharisee,” we may have missed the point.

Too often, we come away from this parable praying in our hearts, “God, I thank you that I am not like this Pharisee.” We’re focused on stereotypes (i.e. ourselves) when we pray.

Instead, of focusing on ourselves, let’s focus on our God. And when you kneel before the Almighty, Holy God in prayer, focused on Him, you’ll find it easy to pray like the tax collector did.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | August 20th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, Jesus asked us one tough question.

As the summer comes to a close, our series on the parables of Jesus is nearing its end too, but it’s not over just yet.

This week we were in Luke 18:1-8, often referred to as the parable of the persistent widow or unrighteous judge. Though this parable is often referenced in lessons about the power of persistent prayer, there’s another layerhere that we dug into.

At the end of the parable, Jesus asks “Nevertheless, when the Son of Man comes, will He find faith on the earth?”  It’s a question directed at us.

Jesus’s point in this parable is that if an unrighteous judge will help a widow, even for selfish reasons, how much more will God be faithful to the people He calls His own.

If we’re wondering if God cares about us, His faithfulness has been proven time and again; the real question is, will He find any faith coming from us? Or will it be buried so deep beneath our jobs, hobbies, lusts, apathy, and pride that He wouldn’t find it—even if we told Him where to look?

To borrow from another parable, Jesus won't find our faith if we bury it underground. How will your faith be found this week?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | July 23rd 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we loosened our grip on the “how” and focused more on the “who.”

We continued our study of Jesus’s parables this week. The farther we get into this study, the more Jesus’s storytelling pulls us in.

Luke 11:1-13 contains an often overlooked parable. The disciples come to Jesus and ask Him to teach them how to pray. The example prayer He gives is less about a ritual practice and more about trusting in God. Every line of the prayer is a reminder that God is in control.

In case the disciples (or we) still don’t get it, Jesus follows it up with a short parable starting in verse 5. The parable is essentially one big question: don’t you realize that God is big enough, wise enough, and good enough to care for us?

You want to know how to pray? Start focusing on who your praying to. Don’t get hung up on the words; get caught up in your Father.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!