parable

This Sunday at Mayfair | August 27th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we learned from the parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector.

One of the hallmarks of a great story is the way it treats stereotypes. Many stories employ stereotypes, but the greatest stories use them to teach us, and the parables of Jesus do just that.

In Luke 18:9-14, Jesus gives us a parable based on two stereotypes: a Pharisee and a tax collector. In our time, we’ve re-stereotyped Pharisees as hypocritical and elitist, but if we want to get the full effect of Jesus’s parable, we need to remember that the Pharisee’s were the “good guys.”

The people hearing the parable, started out thinking “I want to be like the Pharisee, not the tax collector.” But if we immediately stereotype the Pharisee and come away saying “I want to be like the tax collector, not the Pharisee,” we may have missed the point.

Too often, we come away from this parable praying in our hearts, “God, I thank you that I am not like this Pharisee.” We’re focused on stereotypes (i.e. ourselves) when we pray.

Instead, of focusing on ourselves, let’s focus on our God. And when you kneel before the Almighty, Holy God in prayer, focused on Him, you’ll find it easy to pray like the tax collector did.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | August 6th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we listened to the parables of the lost being found.

We’re continuing our study of the parables, and this week, we laid down roots in Luke chapter 15. When we read these parables, we often put ourselves in the position of the lost: a reminder that God is fervently seeking us when we wander.

But there’s another way to read these parables.

When Jesus spoke these parables, he spoke them in response to the Pharisees and teachers of the law. They thought that God favored them above sinners because they kept the Law. They treated the sinners like outcasts because that’s how the Pharisees thought God viewed them.

Jesus told them the truth was the complete opposite. God looks on the sinners and outcasts as someone extremely valuable, but lost to him—someone worth seeking.

We had to take a deep look into our hearts today. How does God look at sinners? Is that the same way we look at them? Or are we just like the Pharisees?

And if you were to ask an outcast—the homeless, the addicted, the outcast—would they be able to tell from your life that God thinks they’re worth finding?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

PS: Don’t forget to sign up for Whiz Kids! If you can read and have time on Monday afternoons to show a 2nd-3rd grader that you care, you’re qualified!

 

This Sunday at Mayfair | July 23rd 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we loosened our grip on the “how” and focused more on the “who.”

We continued our study of Jesus’s parables this week. The farther we get into this study, the more Jesus’s storytelling pulls us in.

Luke 11:1-13 contains an often overlooked parable. The disciples come to Jesus and ask Him to teach them how to pray. The example prayer He gives is less about a ritual practice and more about trusting in God. Every line of the prayer is a reminder that God is in control.

In case the disciples (or we) still don’t get it, Jesus follows it up with a short parable starting in verse 5. The parable is essentially one big question: don’t you realize that God is big enough, wise enough, and good enough to care for us?

You want to know how to pray? Start focusing on who your praying to. Don’t get hung up on the words; get caught up in your Father.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | July 16th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, Jesus humbled our view of our rights and privileges.

Jesus has a way of revealing people to themselves. He knows our hearts better than we do, but he also knows how to help us understand as well. He does it often in His parables, and especially in the parable of the unforgiving servant.

In our culture, it’s easy to detach from others. We come; we go; we get what’s ours and we get out. Mind your own business, make sure you get what’s owed to you, and you’ll do fine.

But if we’re putting ourselves above channeling the love and forgiveness that God gave us into the others in our lives, then we’re undermining the message of the Gospel.

Maybe we’re well within our rights to hold a grudge. Maybe the brother or sister in the pew next to us hasn’t done a single thing to earn an ounce of self-sacrifice from us.

But if we insist on standing on our own rights then God will stand on His.

God made the ultimate sacrifice for you. Now what will you do for others?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | July 9th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we listened to a story from the Master Storyteller.

Maybe you’ve been spending some time in your yard or garden this summer. And if you have, it’s a safe bet to say you’ve probably spent some time in combat with weeds.

Some weeds come up easy enough, but others just won’t go away no matter what you try. It’s tempting to go at them with a spray bottle of weed-killer, but then your grass might suffer the consequences too. Jesus tells a similar story in Matthew chapter 13 about the weeds and the wheat.

Jesus reminds us that even though we live in God’s kingdom, the Enemy has sown in bad along with the good.

The important thing to remember is that even if there are weeds in the field, that doesn’t mean God isn’t working to raise the wheat. It’s hard to understand why so much evil exists, but maybe God is allowing some weeds because some wheat is budding up alongside.

Until the harvest comes, what are you doing to encourage the wheat growing amidst the weeds?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

PS. Join us at our Vacation Bible School this Friday and Saturday! Kids aged 2 years old through the 5th grade are welcome!