God

This Sunday at Mayfair | October 22nd 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we heard the Bible’s last words on prayer.

Our study in Revelation continues—this week, in chapters eight and nine.

According to the Barna research group, an overwhelming majority of Americans say they pray, but how, why, and to whom we pray can vary drastically. There are some consistencies though. For example, most Americans have an individualistic perspective on prayer.

When we pray, sometimes (and maybe even most times), we either pray on autopilot or let our circumstances control how we pray. We pray in the way that seems best to us. But what does God want us to learn about prayer in His last book?

Read Revelation 8:1-5 and you’ll find a few things there. First, prayer is valuable and important. So if you’ve been struggling with doubts about prayer or find you’ve been taking it for granted, take a look at these verses. Another important point is that there’s something sacrificial about prayer. It’s an offering, a submission of our will to His. Whatever your fears or hopes, sacrifice them to God in prayer.

And like Revelation tells us, He will hear, and He will act.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

PS: Trunk or Treat is October 29th. Bring your trunks, your costumes, your candy, and get ready to have a great time with the kids in the community!

This Sunday at Mayfair | October 15th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we heard God’s last words on evil.

Our study in Revelation continues as we make our way into chapter six and seven. John is led into the throne room of heaven and the opening of the seven-sealed scroll begins.

When the first four seals are opened, all kinds of terrible things happen, things many of us have sadly experienced: strife, war, hunger, poverty, disease, death. And when the fifth seal is opened, the voices of all the Christian martyrs call out wanting to know how long it will be until the evil people in the world are judged.

If you wanted to sum up everything that brings us doubt in this life, the first five seals wouldn’t be a bad choice. And after reading, it’s not surprising if you’d want to ask God why evil has to exist in the first place?

What answer does Revelation give? God isn’t trying to explain away evil, but He is in control, and He will judge the world one day. Most importantly, even though bad things happen to good people, God knows His people in the midst of it all.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

PS: Mayfair Trunk or Treat is coming up soon, October 29th! Get involved and get ready for an awesome evening with the community!

This Sunday at Mayfair | September 17th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we started our new series on the “Famous Last Words” of the Bible.

There’s just something about last words that is extremely intriguing. It’s a chance to sum everything up, to leave a legacy, to remind us what’s really important.

To many people, even many Christians, the last words of the Bible are just. . .confusing.

But one of the things we gathered this morning was that the book of Revelation wasn’t meant to confuse, it was meant to be understood, and furthermore, to provide a blessing to those who understood it (Rev 1:3).

God’s message hasn’t changed into something we aren’t meant to understand, right at the end. If we listen, we will understand, and if we understand, how could our lives possibly remain unchanged?

These are the Bible’s famous last words, so if you’re curious what Jesus’s parting message was, join us next Sunday. We’ll be happy to have you!

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members—and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | September 10th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we heard from our guest speaker, Dr. Scot McKnight, on topics from his book, A Fellowship of Differents.

We live in an individualistic, post-modern culture; in our culture, everything is up to the individual and everything is up for debate. Consequently, the very idea of the Church has come under heavy fire recently. For many young people or new Christians, “What’s the point of the Church?” and “Why should I go?” are very serious questions. We talked about the answers today.

Randy and Scot shared the stage—Randy asking Scot questions and Scot giving answers. There was much more said today than we can write here, so we’ll just look at one of the questions for now. (But if you want to know more leave a comment or drop by our building!)

So, what even is “the Church?”

The word “church” is all over the spectrum of meaning these days, but the Church is the expansion of God’s chosen people to include all who are in Christ, not just those who are born to Israel. It’s not a building or an institution; it’s a body of witnesses, a family.

Church is a very important word, but for a day-to-day descriptive word of who we are, Scot thinks Fellowship, a sharing of life, might be more accurate.

How we feel about the Church or gathering together as the Church begins with how we understand the Church. Are we a club? A status symbol? Or are we a family? A chosen people with an overflowing love for Christ and His mission?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | August 27th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we learned from the parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector.

One of the hallmarks of a great story is the way it treats stereotypes. Many stories employ stereotypes, but the greatest stories use them to teach us, and the parables of Jesus do just that.

In Luke 18:9-14, Jesus gives us a parable based on two stereotypes: a Pharisee and a tax collector. In our time, we’ve re-stereotyped Pharisees as hypocritical and elitist, but if we want to get the full effect of Jesus’s parable, we need to remember that the Pharisee’s were the “good guys.”

The people hearing the parable, started out thinking “I want to be like the Pharisee, not the tax collector.” But if we immediately stereotype the Pharisee and come away saying “I want to be like the tax collector, not the Pharisee,” we may have missed the point.

Too often, we come away from this parable praying in our hearts, “God, I thank you that I am not like this Pharisee.” We’re focused on stereotypes (i.e. ourselves) when we pray.

Instead, of focusing on ourselves, let’s focus on our God. And when you kneel before the Almighty, Holy God in prayer, focused on Him, you’ll find it easy to pray like the tax collector did.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | August 20th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, Jesus asked us one tough question.

As the summer comes to a close, our series on the parables of Jesus is nearing its end too, but it’s not over just yet.

This week we were in Luke 18:1-8, often referred to as the parable of the persistent widow or unrighteous judge. Though this parable is often referenced in lessons about the power of persistent prayer, there’s another layerhere that we dug into.

At the end of the parable, Jesus asks “Nevertheless, when the Son of Man comes, will He find faith on the earth?”  It’s a question directed at us.

Jesus’s point in this parable is that if an unrighteous judge will help a widow, even for selfish reasons, how much more will God be faithful to the people He calls His own.

If we’re wondering if God cares about us, His faithfulness has been proven time and again; the real question is, will He find any faith coming from us? Or will it be buried so deep beneath our jobs, hobbies, lusts, apathy, and pride that He wouldn’t find it—even if we told Him where to look?

To borrow from another parable, Jesus won't find our faith if we bury it underground. How will your faith be found this week?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | August 6th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we listened to the parables of the lost being found.

We’re continuing our study of the parables, and this week, we laid down roots in Luke chapter 15. When we read these parables, we often put ourselves in the position of the lost: a reminder that God is fervently seeking us when we wander.

But there’s another way to read these parables.

When Jesus spoke these parables, he spoke them in response to the Pharisees and teachers of the law. They thought that God favored them above sinners because they kept the Law. They treated the sinners like outcasts because that’s how the Pharisees thought God viewed them.

Jesus told them the truth was the complete opposite. God looks on the sinners and outcasts as someone extremely valuable, but lost to him—someone worth seeking.

We had to take a deep look into our hearts today. How does God look at sinners? Is that the same way we look at them? Or are we just like the Pharisees?

And if you were to ask an outcast—the homeless, the addicted, the outcast—would they be able to tell from your life that God thinks they’re worth finding?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

PS: Don’t forget to sign up for Whiz Kids! If you can read and have time on Monday afternoons to show a 2nd-3rd grader that you care, you’re qualified!

 

This Sunday at Mayfair | June 4th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we celebrated some members of our family moving on to new stages in life and read the radical story of the mustard seed.

We’re really excited as the summer brings some of our younger members into new stages of life. We recognized the soon to be married Kristen Hosch and Blaine Talmadge and the recently married Zach and Savannah Shaffer, and we also brought all our kids up on stage to recognize their accomplishments in completing another year of study at Mayfair.

Now, you may have not realized, but mustard seeds are pretty radical. At least to the Jews of Jesus’s day, they were—and not in a good way.

When Jesus says the Kingdom of God is like a mustard seed, it wasn’t what the Jews were expecting. It's not an elegant plant. The mustard plant grows wildly and can take over an entire garden—not at all like the hedged and ordered religion the Jews of Jesus’s day were living.

It’s much easier to get comfortable, but maybe we’ve been living like the Kingdom of God is like a row of carrots instead of a radical, change-inducing mustard seed?

If so, how will you change to be more like the Kingdom Jesus reveals in Matthew 13?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | May 21st 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we recommitted ourselves to our duties as priests.

To paraphrase CS Lewis, the greatest joy to be found in any relationship is found between those who, from the beginning, have taken each other seriously. A deeper respect yields deeper understanding, and it doesn’t take a genius to realize that the more two people understand each other, the more potential for joy and harmony in their relationship.

No, it doesn’t take genius, but it does take diligence.

We’re still studying Malachi and the Israelite’s question (many times, our question): "Is it futile to serve God?"

What’s God’s reply? “If it seems like this relationship isn’t going the way you want it to, it’s because you haven’t taken Me seriously.” Even the priests, the ones who have the responsibility of exemplifying and facilitating the Great Relationship between God and the people, were apathetic.

The message really hit home for us. We’re supposed to be God’s royal priesthood; it’s our duty to teach people about Him and His Truth. And it’s more than that. Our priesthood, our teaching, our relationship with God, our joy in that relationship—they’re all tied up in our love and respect for God.

If you’re a Christian, how will you make Malachi 2:5-7 true of you this week?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on our Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!