This Sunday at Mayfair | October 1st 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we heard the Bible’s last word on the Church and dared to examine ourselves.

We’re forging ahead with our study of Revelation, and we made it to the messages to the seven churches of Asia Minor today (Revelation 2-3).

Jesus’s messages to the Asia Minor churches were first written down hundreds upon hundreds of years ago, but they pierced our hearts all the same today. The sharp sword coming from the mouth of Jesus is definitely something Revelation has right in its imagery.

The devil’s been sowing a lot of doubt in the world recently, and he’s given us plenty of reasons to fly under the radar, to keep our faith shut up inside.

But with every letter we read, in every rebuke and every praise, it was as if Jesus was daring us to dream bigger—to fall in love with Him all over again.

“Stop just going through the motions. Hang in there! Resist the temptation to compromise. Keep growing! Don’t be content with mediocrity! Take advantage of every evangelistic opportunity. Renew your sense of devotion.” That’s what He said to us today. His words ran deep, and it’s not something we can ignore.

We want to drive out any part of us that’s become lukewarm for Christ and His Kingdom. What about you?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members—and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | September 17th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we started our new series on the “Famous Last Words” of the Bible.

There’s just something about last words that is extremely intriguing. It’s a chance to sum everything up, to leave a legacy, to remind us what’s really important.

To many people, even many Christians, the last words of the Bible are just. . .confusing.

But one of the things we gathered this morning was that the book of Revelation wasn’t meant to confuse, it was meant to be understood, and furthermore, to provide a blessing to those who understood it (Rev 1:3).

God’s message hasn’t changed into something we aren’t meant to understand, right at the end. If we listen, we will understand, and if we understand, how could our lives possibly remain unchanged?

These are the Bible’s famous last words, so if you’re curious what Jesus’s parting message was, join us next Sunday. We’ll be happy to have you!

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members—and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | September 10th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we heard from our guest speaker, Dr. Scot McKnight, on topics from his book, A Fellowship of Differents.

We live in an individualistic, post-modern culture; in our culture, everything is up to the individual and everything is up for debate. Consequently, the very idea of the Church has come under heavy fire recently. For many young people or new Christians, “What’s the point of the Church?” and “Why should I go?” are very serious questions. We talked about the answers today.

Randy and Scot shared the stage—Randy asking Scot questions and Scot giving answers. There was much more said today than we can write here, so we’ll just look at one of the questions for now. (But if you want to know more leave a comment or drop by our building!)

So, what even is “the Church?”

The word “church” is all over the spectrum of meaning these days, but the Church is the expansion of God’s chosen people to include all who are in Christ, not just those who are born to Israel. It’s not a building or an institution; it’s a body of witnesses, a family.

Church is a very important word, but for a day-to-day descriptive word of who we are, Scot thinks Fellowship, a sharing of life, might be more accurate.

How we feel about the Church or gathering together as the Church begins with how we understand the Church. Are we a club? A status symbol? Or are we a family? A chosen people with an overflowing love for Christ and His mission?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | September 3rd 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we took joy in our fellowship.

It’s Labor Day weekend, and that means holiday plans and family get togethers, but Satan—never one to miss an opportunity—often tries to convince us that a holiday is a great time to take a break from assembling as the Church as well.

So, we spent time in Hebrews 10: 24-25 today. If we grew up with Christian parents, they’d often cite this verse to us if we ever complained about not wanting to go to church that day. “Don’t forsake the assembling of the saints.”

But there’s so much more than a simple command in this passage; there’s an amazing and uplifting “why.”

The writer of Hebrews has been building up to this part of the book for more than 9 chapters now, proving again and again how wonderful Christ is and how much He’s transformed our lives. What’s his next point? The Church is where the life-giving power of Jesus gets magnified from one person to another in exponential growth. We “spur one another on toward love and good deeds.”

A spur isn’t always the most comfortable experience, but knowing your brothers and sisters are fighting the same battles as you, with the same hope in the Lord as you…there’s nothing like it.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

P.S. Remember to put together a bucket for our Houston relief effort, and spread the word about our special guest speaker, Scot McKnight, coming next weekend!

This Sunday at Mayfair | August 27th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we learned from the parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector.

One of the hallmarks of a great story is the way it treats stereotypes. Many stories employ stereotypes, but the greatest stories use them to teach us, and the parables of Jesus do just that.

In Luke 18:9-14, Jesus gives us a parable based on two stereotypes: a Pharisee and a tax collector. In our time, we’ve re-stereotyped Pharisees as hypocritical and elitist, but if we want to get the full effect of Jesus’s parable, we need to remember that the Pharisee’s were the “good guys.”

The people hearing the parable, started out thinking “I want to be like the Pharisee, not the tax collector.” But if we immediately stereotype the Pharisee and come away saying “I want to be like the tax collector, not the Pharisee,” we may have missed the point.

Too often, we come away from this parable praying in our hearts, “God, I thank you that I am not like this Pharisee.” We’re focused on stereotypes (i.e. ourselves) when we pray.

Instead, of focusing on ourselves, let’s focus on our God. And when you kneel before the Almighty, Holy God in prayer, focused on Him, you’ll find it easy to pray like the tax collector did.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | August 20th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, Jesus asked us one tough question.

As the summer comes to a close, our series on the parables of Jesus is nearing its end too, but it’s not over just yet.

This week we were in Luke 18:1-8, often referred to as the parable of the persistent widow or unrighteous judge. Though this parable is often referenced in lessons about the power of persistent prayer, there’s another layerhere that we dug into.

At the end of the parable, Jesus asks “Nevertheless, when the Son of Man comes, will He find faith on the earth?”  It’s a question directed at us.

Jesus’s point in this parable is that if an unrighteous judge will help a widow, even for selfish reasons, how much more will God be faithful to the people He calls His own.

If we’re wondering if God cares about us, His faithfulness has been proven time and again; the real question is, will He find any faith coming from us? Or will it be buried so deep beneath our jobs, hobbies, lusts, apathy, and pride that He wouldn’t find it—even if we told Him where to look?

To borrow from another parable, Jesus won't find our faith if we bury it underground. How will your faith be found this week?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | August 6th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we listened to the parables of the lost being found.

We’re continuing our study of the parables, and this week, we laid down roots in Luke chapter 15. When we read these parables, we often put ourselves in the position of the lost: a reminder that God is fervently seeking us when we wander.

But there’s another way to read these parables.

When Jesus spoke these parables, he spoke them in response to the Pharisees and teachers of the law. They thought that God favored them above sinners because they kept the Law. They treated the sinners like outcasts because that’s how the Pharisees thought God viewed them.

Jesus told them the truth was the complete opposite. God looks on the sinners and outcasts as someone extremely valuable, but lost to him—someone worth seeking.

We had to take a deep look into our hearts today. How does God look at sinners? Is that the same way we look at them? Or are we just like the Pharisees?

And if you were to ask an outcast—the homeless, the addicted, the outcast—would they be able to tell from your life that God thinks they’re worth finding?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

PS: Don’t forget to sign up for Whiz Kids! If you can read and have time on Monday afternoons to show a 2nd-3rd grader that you care, you’re qualified!

 

This Sunday at Mayfair | July 23rd 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we loosened our grip on the “how” and focused more on the “who.”

We continued our study of Jesus’s parables this week. The farther we get into this study, the more Jesus’s storytelling pulls us in.

Luke 11:1-13 contains an often overlooked parable. The disciples come to Jesus and ask Him to teach them how to pray. The example prayer He gives is less about a ritual practice and more about trusting in God. Every line of the prayer is a reminder that God is in control.

In case the disciples (or we) still don’t get it, Jesus follows it up with a short parable starting in verse 5. The parable is essentially one big question: don’t you realize that God is big enough, wise enough, and good enough to care for us?

You want to know how to pray? Start focusing on who your praying to. Don’t get hung up on the words; get caught up in your Father.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | July 16th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, Jesus humbled our view of our rights and privileges.

Jesus has a way of revealing people to themselves. He knows our hearts better than we do, but he also knows how to help us understand as well. He does it often in His parables, and especially in the parable of the unforgiving servant.

In our culture, it’s easy to detach from others. We come; we go; we get what’s ours and we get out. Mind your own business, make sure you get what’s owed to you, and you’ll do fine.

But if we’re putting ourselves above channeling the love and forgiveness that God gave us into the others in our lives, then we’re undermining the message of the Gospel.

Maybe we’re well within our rights to hold a grudge. Maybe the brother or sister in the pew next to us hasn’t done a single thing to earn an ounce of self-sacrifice from us.

But if we insist on standing on our own rights then God will stand on His.

God made the ultimate sacrifice for you. Now what will you do for others?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | July 9th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we listened to a story from the Master Storyteller.

Maybe you’ve been spending some time in your yard or garden this summer. And if you have, it’s a safe bet to say you’ve probably spent some time in combat with weeds.

Some weeds come up easy enough, but others just won’t go away no matter what you try. It’s tempting to go at them with a spray bottle of weed-killer, but then your grass might suffer the consequences too. Jesus tells a similar story in Matthew chapter 13 about the weeds and the wheat.

Jesus reminds us that even though we live in God’s kingdom, the Enemy has sown in bad along with the good.

The important thing to remember is that even if there are weeds in the field, that doesn’t mean God isn’t working to raise the wheat. It’s hard to understand why so much evil exists, but maybe God is allowing some weeds because some wheat is budding up alongside.

Until the harvest comes, what are you doing to encourage the wheat growing amidst the weeds?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

PS. Join us at our Vacation Bible School this Friday and Saturday! Kids aged 2 years old through the 5th grade are welcome!

 

This Sunday at Mayfair | June 11th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we praised the God of Justice.

We were excited to welcome Randy back to the pulpit this week as he returned from the last class in his doctorate program. Lord willing, we will be hearing a message from Dr. Randy Johns around this time next year!

With Randy back, we returned to our study of Malachi. We picked back up with 2:17-3:5.

The Israelites had made a habit of questioning whether or not God truly was a God of justice. It’s a good thing to ask God for wisdom to understand how He is just when we are going through a period of doubt, but that isn’t what the Israelites were doing.

They asked questions not to get answers, but to challenge God.

The answer to their questions is coming, God said, but when it does, the Israelites will have to give answers of their own about how they handled justice.

God expects His people to be a people of justice. Will we leave the world wondering, or will we show them that our God truly cares about the rights and wrong in this world?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | June 4th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we celebrated some members of our family moving on to new stages in life and read the radical story of the mustard seed.

We’re really excited as the summer brings some of our younger members into new stages of life. We recognized the soon to be married Kristen Hosch and Blaine Talmadge and the recently married Zach and Savannah Shaffer, and we also brought all our kids up on stage to recognize their accomplishments in completing another year of study at Mayfair.

Now, you may have not realized, but mustard seeds are pretty radical. At least to the Jews of Jesus’s day, they were—and not in a good way.

When Jesus says the Kingdom of God is like a mustard seed, it wasn’t what the Jews were expecting. It's not an elegant plant. The mustard plant grows wildly and can take over an entire garden—not at all like the hedged and ordered religion the Jews of Jesus’s day were living.

It’s much easier to get comfortable, but maybe we’ve been living like the Kingdom of God is like a row of carrots instead of a radical, change-inducing mustard seed?

If so, how will you change to be more like the Kingdom Jesus reveals in Matthew 13?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | May 28th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we heard the testimony of our Witness.

When was the last time you made an oath? These days, we don’t commonly find ourselves in situations that require oath-taking, but there are a few that come to mind.

Marriage, for instance, is one of the most famous oaths. The ceremony of a marriage may change with time and culture, but the principle has remained the same: a man and a woman, two people, two families, two histories become one through the bond of an oath.

Part of what makes this oath so special is that God is called to be a witness to it, and He takes that responsibility very seriously.

We learned from Malachi 2:10-16 today that Christianity’s not just about a personal relationship with God; it’s about all our relationships. The Israelite men couldn’t understand why God wouldn’t hear their worship, but God says it was simple: because of their unfaithfulness to their wives, a broken promise that the Lord had not forgotten.

These guys did everything “right” in the temple, but they became apathetic with the oaths they made before God.

How will you show God your fidelity this week?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | May 21st 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we recommitted ourselves to our duties as priests.

To paraphrase CS Lewis, the greatest joy to be found in any relationship is found between those who, from the beginning, have taken each other seriously. A deeper respect yields deeper understanding, and it doesn’t take a genius to realize that the more two people understand each other, the more potential for joy and harmony in their relationship.

No, it doesn’t take genius, but it does take diligence.

We’re still studying Malachi and the Israelite’s question (many times, our question): "Is it futile to serve God?"

What’s God’s reply? “If it seems like this relationship isn’t going the way you want it to, it’s because you haven’t taken Me seriously.” Even the priests, the ones who have the responsibility of exemplifying and facilitating the Great Relationship between God and the people, were apathetic.

The message really hit home for us. We’re supposed to be God’s royal priesthood; it’s our duty to teach people about Him and His Truth. And it’s more than that. Our priesthood, our teaching, our relationship with God, our joy in that relationship—they’re all tied up in our love and respect for God.

If you’re a Christian, how will you make Malachi 2:5-7 true of you this week?

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on our Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

This Sunday at Mayfair | May 14th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we dove deeper into worship and our relationship with God.

Sometimes worship can feel like a burden. It’s the elephant in the room; there are days, weeks, months, maybe even longer periods of time, when coming to Church on Sunday feels more like a chore than worship. We don’t talk about it much, but we’ve all felt it at one time or another.

God called Malachi to prophecy to Israel because they had made complacency commonplace in their worship. Israel’s half-hearted sacrifices didn't please God. If they weren’t going to take Him seriously, how could they expect to have a relationship with Him?

In a culture that is so easily bored and satisfied with doing things halfway, we want to be different. We can’t earn God’s favor by giving Him our best—like He’s some kind of vending machine—but we can show God that we truly love Him as our Father, Master, Friend, and God. And the worship that grows out of that relationship won't be a burden; it will be the joy of those who know the other is fully committed to them, 100%.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you today, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

PS: Happy Mother’s Day!

 

This Sunday at Mayfair | April 23rd 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we asked ourselves a very important question: "Now what?"

The day of Easter has passed, but that shouldn't mean that the meaning of Easter gets left in the past as well. How do we carry that forward?

Randy’s sermon focused on the mission Jesus gave us before He ascended and on the hearts of His disciples as they received that mission. One of the messages that really stuck with us was that God is still working on us—and that’s okay.

In Matthew’s gospel, he records that some disciples had doubts, even as they worshiped the risen Lord. Our doubts aren’t really something that gets brought into the open very much, but it was refreshing to listen and talk to each other about the doubts that we have and, most importantly, how God is able to accomplish the impossible with us, even when we have doubts.

We have a mission ahead of us.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you or the mission He’s given you, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

PS: Get excited for the guest speaker, vacation bible school, and high school senior graduation celebration this summer! Spread the news!

This Sunday at Mayfair | April 9th 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we walked with Jesus in the days before his death and resurrection.

It’s one thing to be a consumer during the festivities of Easter, but being Jesus’ disciple as He endures the path to execution (and still bids us to follow Him)...that’s a completely different lifestyle.

After services, we had a potluck lunch in the fellowship hall, and some of us talked more about how Jesus’ time in the garden prepared Him for His time on the cross. It was encouraging to see just how much this part of Jesus’ life really affected us for the better—like as parents talked about finding more patience with their kids in the times that they were most challenging and sharing more joy with them in the times that they were most excited.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!

PS: Happy 59th birthday to Mayfair! May God bless us with many more to come.

This Sunday at Mayfair | April 2nd 2017

This Sunday at Mayfair, we put things in perspective.

With Easter on the horizon, Randy’s sermon was about Jesus in the days and weeks leading up to his crucifixion. It really got some of us thinking about just how dedicated God is to loving us. As all-important as Jesus sacrifice at the cross is, it wasn’t just there that He sacrificed. His diligent, sacrificial love was there in everything that he did—every day of His life.

Randy’s pre-sermon comments also got us thinking as well. He talked about having a calling. Everyone seemed to lean in as he spoke, especially some of our brothers and sisters in the college group. With graduations, job hunts, doubts, fears, and hopes looming, it was encouraging (even inspiring) to hear Randy speak off-the-cuff about our calling and giving Jesus our best. I don’t think any of us ever come away unedified when the preacher steps out of the pulpit for a heart-to-heart.

If you were at Mayfair this Sunday and want to share how God edified you, leave a comment here or on the Facebook page and share your encouragement. If you’re a visitor or thinking about attending Mayfair, take a look at our website, contact our staff and members, and of course, come and join us!